Omar Minaya likely to be "reassigned" after the season

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Jon Heyman reports that Omar Minaya is likely to be “reassigned” this year. Which is a way of firing him without really firing him, seeing as though he still has a year on his contract. Minaya came up through scouting and is said to both enjoy it and have a good eye for it, so maybe he’ll be some sort of Scout Emeritus or something.

Heyman drops Kevin Towers’ name as a replacement but thinks assistant GM John Ricco is more likely. I tend to agree. Towers doesn’t want any part of a dysfunctional ownership group, which is what the Mets are. Ricco is far more beholden to the Wilpons and would likely do exactly what they want. Which is how they seem to like it.

Heyman also notes that Bob Melvin is no longer considered to be the front runner for the Mets managerial job.  Hard to say if he ever truly was — Heyman had been the only one reporting that, and had been for a long time — but now he says that’s no longer operative. In his defense it made sense in that the Wilpons brought him in as a vague advisor that looked more like a manager-in-waiting gig than anything else.  Heyman says that Wally Backman is a distinct possibility.

If the Mets follow form, they’ll see what the newspapers and talk radio says about all of this before they make their decision. 

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.