Chris Sale is thriving in the White Sox's bullpen three months after being drafted

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Three months ago Chris Sale was a starting pitcher for Florida Gulf Coast College and now he’s perhaps the most-trusted reliever in the White Sox’s bullpen, picking up his first career victory with 2.2 flawless innings yesterday.
Selected with the 13th overall pick in June’s draft and almost immediately signed to a $1.65 million bonus, Sale made quick work of the minors and has allowed just one run in 13.2 innings since his August 6 debut.
And while the rail-thin southpaw may not look like much at 6-foot-6 and 170 pounds–with even that weigh-in presumably coming after a large breakfast–his average fastball has clocked in at 96.2 miles per hour and Sale has also shown a devastatingly effective high-80s slider.
He’s struggled at times to throw strikes, walking nine batters in 13.2 innings, but opponents are just 6-for-45 (.133) with 19 strikeouts off Sale and the 21-year-old lefty has amazingly held right-handed hitters to a .074 batting average and zero extra-base hits in 27 at-bats.
Much like how Ozzie Guillen and the White Sox rode then-rookie Bobby Jenks to the World Series in 2005, if Chicago is going to catch Minnesota in the AL Central it looks like Sale will be a huge reason why.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.