Rob Dibble fired as Nationals television analyst

16 Comments

Rob Dibble made headlines twice last month for controversial comments about female baseball fans and Stephen Strasburg’s elbow injury, and today MASN and the Nationals announced that he’s been let go as the team’s television analyst.
I’ve written quite a bit about Dibble recently, so I won’t rehash all my points again, but suffice it to say there are a lot of happy Nationals fans right now.
Ultimately telling Strasburg to “suck it up” and “stop crying” when it turned out he had an elbow injury that requires Tommy John surgery is what cost Dibble his job, but even setting aside the various controversies he could have just as easily been fired for simply being a terrible announcer.
Dibble was a Hawk Harrelson-level homer, except without any of the charm, story-telling ability, clever phrase-turning, or worthwhile analysis. He was just all grunts and low-brow machismo, and no real baseball fan tunes into a game to hear that garbage. I’m sure he’ll land on his feet with another prominent gig, because “loud” and “controversial” can generate ratings, but for now at least he’s no longer in the same profession as Vin Scully.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Leave a comment

2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.