Nyjer Morgan charges mound, incites brawl in Florida

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The same player who threw a ball at a fan in Philadelphia in mid-August, steamrolled an unsuspecting Cardinals backup catcher last week, and gave Marlins catcher Brett Hayes a dislocated shoulder on Tuesday night with a ridiculous hockey-like check at home plate is back at it again.

Nationals outfielder Nyjer Morgan started a benches-clearing clearing brawl on Wednesday night at the Marlins’ Sun
Life Stadium when he charged the mound after Florida right-hander Chris
Volstad threw behind him in the sixth inning. 

Morgan was hit by a Volstad pitch earlier in the night that served as retaliation for his cheap shot on Hayes, but the Fish took exception again when he stole second base and stole third base in a blowout. 

He headed straight toward Volstad after the pitch whizzed by him in the sixth, threw a punch to the pitcher’s face, then was clothes-lined by Marlins first baseman Gaby Sanchez. 

Volstad got a few grazing shots in on Morgan before Nationals third base coach Pat Listach jumped on the right-hander and held him to the ground.  Listach, while mostly serving as a peacemaker, is sure to see some discipline from Major League Baseball for interfering so violently with a player scuffle. 

Morgan was ejected and screamed at the fans in south Florida before making his exit, pumping his chest in pride.  Volstad was also tossed and is likely to be handed a lengthy suspension.

The Marlins have a series in D.C. in mid-September that should feature even more fireworks.

Manny Machado rips MLB Network talking heads over double standards

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Manny Machado has had his fair share of controversies. There was the stuff about his lack of hustle last fall. He’s thrown bats and ran into and over guys and has argued with umpires and all of that stuff. Is he well-liked? Not really. Is he a dirty player? Some say so. But even if you don’t say so, he’s been involved in some dirty plays and he’s rubbed a lot of people the wrong way. We chronicled much of that last fall.

But he’s certainly not the only guy who has done that sort of thing before. Others have and, I think it’s fair to say, others have not caught as much flak for it as he has. There are reasons for that too, of course. Part of it is that a couple of Machado’s transgressions came in very high-profile situations like last year’s playoffs. Part of it is that he’s a big star who makes a lot of money and guys like that tend to get more attention and heat than others. Part of it is that a lot people simply don’t like Machado for whatever reason.

Machado talked at length about that last night when he took to Instagram to mock MLB Network analysts Eric Byrnes and Dan Plesac, who were going on about the Jake Marisnick plunking and his barreling into Jonathan Lucroy that led to it. Byrnes and Plesac were defending Marisnick. Machado noted that he would never have gotten that kind of defense had it been him doing the barreling instead of Marisnick.

Watch (warning: NSFW language):

 

I don’t think he’s wrong about that. Again, some of it would be justified in that Machado does have a reputation and when you have a reputation you don’t get as much benefit of the doubt. But it’s also the case that Machado was not getting much benefit of the doubt — including from these guys in particular — well before that reputation was established.

Over at the Big Lead, they found examples of Byrnes going after Machado way back in 2014. Machado’s transgressions have, from the beginning, been cast as a those of a dirty, hotheaded player who lacks class. Other players who have done exactly what Machado has done often get excused for showing “passion” and “competitiveness” or for “playing hard” instead of “playing dirty” even when there isn’t all that much actual difference between the acts in question.

Machado says it’s attributable, at least in part, to him being Latino. I think people can reasonably disagree on the question of whether Machado, personally, has been unfairly judged. But I think it’s pretty indisputable that, generally, Latino players get way, way, way less benefit of the doubt for “hard play” vs. “dirty play” and for being “hotheaded” as opposed to being “competitors” than non-Latinos get. Those stereotypes are well-established. Academic research has been conducted on that stuff, confirming such inherent bias on the part of white commentators. Some of Machado’s peers in the game have said the same thing, both in general, and about Machado’s treatment personally.

Which is to say, whether or not Machado has earned the treatment he gets, he has a point here.