C.J. Wilson's transition from bullpen to rotation has been huge for the Rangers

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After four years spent exclusively as a reliever C.J. Wilson convinced the Rangers to give him the chance to claim a rotation spot this spring and five months later he’s been one of the best starting pitchers in the American League.
Wilson shut out the Royals for 7.2 innings yesterday, improving to 14-5 with a 2.88 ERA and 140 strikeouts in 171.2 innings. He leads the league with 77 walks, but has made up for it by having the league’s lowest opponents’ batting average and remarkably giving up just eight homers in 707 plate appearances despite calling Texas’ hitter-friendly ballpark home.
He’s been absolutely unhittable against left-handed batters, holding them to a .124 average and zero homers in 129 at-bats, and even right-handers are hitting just .227/.327/.333 against him. He’s essentially taken his effectiveness as a reliever and transferred it almost exactly to starting, all while throwing 100 more (and counting) innings than ever before.
What’s interesting about Wilson’s transition from relieving to starting is that he’s thrown significantly fewer fastballs than he did working out of the bullpen. Each season from 2005-2009 he threw at least 70 percent fastballs, but this year he’s relied on the pitch just 49.1 percent of the time, which is the sixth-lowest rate among all AL starters.
Wilson is throwing a cutter far more, with a great deal of success, and has also leaned heavily on his curveball and changeup after years of barely using either pitch. As a reliever Wilson threw his fastball or slider 90-95 percent of the time, but as a starter he’s used those two pitches just 62 percent of the time. Wilson believed he had the stuff to succeed as a starter, the Rangers gave him the opportunity at age 29, and now he’s got the fourth-best ERA in the league for a first-place team.
Plus, he’s great to follow on Twitter.

On a night full of letdowns, Yankees’ defense let them down the most

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Game 4 of the ALCS was a gigantic letdown for the Yankees for myriad reasons. They lost, first and foremost, 8-3 to the Astros to fall behind three games to one. Their fans continued to act boorishly. CC Sabathia exited with an injury, likely the final time he’ll pitch in his career. The offense went 0-for-7 with runners in scoring position.

The biggest letdown of the night, though, was the Yankees’ defense. They committed four errors, their highest total in a postseason game since committing five errors in Game 2 of the 1976 ALCS.

Make no mistake: the two three-run home runs hit by George Springer and Carlos Correa, given up by Masahiro and Chad Green respectively, were the big blows in the game. But the errors contributed to the loss and were downright demoralizing.

The first error came at the start of the top of the sixth inning, when Alex Bregman hit a cue shot to first baseman DJ LeMahieu. LeMahieu couldn’t read the bounce and the ball clanked off of his knee, allowing Bregman to reach safely. He would score later in the inning on Correa’s blast.

The Yankees committed two errors in the top of the eighth, leading to a run. Yuli Gurriel hit another grounder to LeMahieu, which he couldn’t handle. That not only allowed Gurriel to reach safely, but Bregman — who led off with a double — moved to third base. He would score when second baseman Gleyber Torres couldn’t handle a Yordan Álvarez grounder.

Error number four occurred when Altuve hit a grounder to Torres to lead off the top of the ninth. The ball skipped right under his glove. Facing Michael Brantley, Jonathan Loaisiga uncorked a wild pitch which advanced Altuve to second base. Brantley followed up with a line drive single to left field, plating Altuve for another run. Loaisiga would throw another wild pitch facing Bregman but that one didn’t come back to haunt him.

The Yankees can’t control injuries, the behavior of their fans, or how good the Astros’ pitching is on any given night. They can control the quality of their defense. On Thursday, it was a farce, and now they’re staring down the barrel of having to win three consecutive games against the Astros to stave off elimination.