Ambiorix Burgos accused of poisoning ex-wife

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OK, our first thought was that Ambiorix Burgos being in “more legal trouble,” as the ESPN headline kindly puts it, probably wouldn’t be worthy of our readers’ time on such a newsy day.
But then again, we didn’t know yet that he had allegedly turned to rat poison to deal with his ex-wife.
Burgos, who saved 18 games for the Royals in 2006 and was last seen in the majors with the Mets in 2007, was previously accused in a hit-and-run accident that killed two women in the Dominican Republic in 2008. He was acquitted of the charges, however.
At last check, he was being jailed in New York for beating his girlfriend in a hotel near Shea Stadium in Sept. 2008. The 26-year-old spent six months in prison, and he was deported to the Dominican Republic after serving his time.
As for the latest incident, well, we’ll let Adam Rubin handle it:

Authorities say Burgos drugged his ex-wife with rat poison. She was found semi-conscious and dizzy and later hospitalized. Burgos was reportedly caught en route to Santo Domingo in his white Hummer with his ex-wife in the car. The ex-wife had been hiding in the district attorney’s home in Nagua, D.R., because of alleged threats on her life.

Here’s the Listin Diario report for our spanish-speaking readers.
Burgos is facing charges of kidnapping and attempted murder. If convicted, he faces up to 30 years in prison.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.