Nats' third base coach Pat Listach would like to manage Cubs

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Throw another name in the ring. We first heard of his interest over the weekend, but Nationals third base coach Pat Listach reiterated to Bill Ladson of MLB.com that he would like to manage the Cubs.

“I would definitely like the job,” Listach said.  “But I have a job to
do here in Washington. If that job is available, it would be a dream
come true. When you bring a championship to that city and that team, it’s
a big deal.”

“It’s one of the elite jobs in baseball. When you
start talking about the Cubs, Yankees, Red Sox and Dodgers, that’s the
elite of the elite. Just to be considered is an honor. It makes me feel
good as a person that I’ve done the right things in this game that
people would consider me.”

Listach, who turns 43 next month, never played with the Cubs during his six-year major league career, however he managed or coached for nine seasons in the team’s minor league system. He compiled a 253-221 record over three-plus seasons as a manager, including winning the PCL’s Manager of the Year Award with Triple-A Iowa in 2008. This is Listach’s second season as Washington’s third base coach.

Listach has a very impressive resume, but he’ll have to beat out interim manager Mike Quade, Fredi Gonzalez, Ryne Sandberg and Bob Brenly, among others, for the post. It won’t be easy. You don’t need me to tell you that the Cubs haven’t won a World Series since 1908. Whoever can break that streak will be a hero in the city forever, so there’s endless appeal to the gig.  

Roy Halladay won’t wear Blue Jays or Phillies cap on Hall of Fame plaque

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In 2016, late pitcher Roy Halladay was asked if he would prefer to wear a Blue Jays or Phillies cap on his plaque if he were to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Per Mark Zwolinski of the Toronto Star, Halladay said, “I’d go as a Blue Jay.” He added, “I wanted to retire here, too, just because I felt like this is the bulk of my career.”

Obviously, circumstances have changed as Halladay tragically died in a plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida in November 2017. Halladay was elected to the Hall of Fame yesterday, becoming the first player to be posthumously elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility since Christy Mathewson in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year.

Today, Arash Madani reports that Halladay’s wife Brandy said her late husband will not wear a cap with the emblem of either team on his plaque. He will instead be portrayed with a generic baseball cap. Brandy said, “He was a Major League Baseball player and that’s how we want him to be remembered.”

Halladay spent 16 years in the majors, 12 with the Blue Jays and four with the Phillies. He meant a lot to both teams. He was a six-time All-Star and won the AL Cy Young Award in 2003 with the Jays. He won the NL Cy Young in 2010 with the Phillies and was a runner-up for the award in 2011, making the All-Star team both years and helping the Phillies continue their streak of reaching the postseason, which lasted from 2007-11. Halladay authored a perfect game in the regular season against the Marlins and a no-hitter in the postseason against the Reds as a member of the Phillies in 2010 as well.

In aggregate, Halladay won 203 games with a 3.38 ERA and 2,117 strikeouts in 2,749 1/3 innings during his storied 16-year career which was unfortunately cut a bit short by injuries.