Judge issues gag order (finally!) in Clemens case

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According to the Associated Press, the judge on the Roger Clemens perjury case has issued a gag order prohibiting “public comments by the principles in the case.”

It’s about time.

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton is worried that lawyers (that means you Rusty Hardin) and potential witnesses (and you Brian McNamee) could affect the jury pool by spouting off to the media. After all, it would be a shame to spend all this time putting a trial together and then not be able to find any acceptable jurors, because there are some people out there who don’t know anything about Roger Clemens and his alleged steroid use, right?

“Further action in violation of this admonition will be confronted of the full authority of the Court,” Walton wrote in the order that covers “the parties, any potential witnesses, and counsel for those parties and witnesses.”

Clearly this judge, who presided over the “Scooter” Libby trial, means business.

So since we won’t be receiving anymore great quotes from Hardin, Clemens and the gang, here are a few of the most recent comments from key figures to keep you occupied until the trial starts:

Clemens: “We’re going to deal with it, guys, I don’t really know what else to say. We’re going to deal with it and have our day.”

Hardin: “The government made a recommendation [for a plea agreement] and we declined. I will tell you the recommendation they made was a very good one if he was guilty. And if he was guilty we would have jumped on it.”

Jose Canseco: “There’s got to be better ways to spend taxpayer money.”

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Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.