Document shows that Jamie McCourt does too own the Dodgers

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Recently there has been some noise about Jamie and Frank McCourt settling their divorce case and Frank buying Jamie out. A lot of this is likely borne of a desire to avoid a nasty trail that would likely have a lot of stuff about people sleeping with people who weren’t their spouse at the time and overpaid faith healers and other ugly things showing how the rich are different than you and me.

A lot of it, however, likely also has to do with the fact that Jamie faces a pretty tough fight to get around that document she signed basically giving the Dodgers to Frank in exchange for all of their personal real estate.  But that part of the equation may be changing:

Jamie McCourt’s attorneys said Thursday they have located a document
showing she has an equal stake in the ownership of the Los Angeles
Dodgers and that the revelation will dramatically alter a bitter
struggle for the team amid McCourt’s divorce proceedings . . .

. . . Thursday’s filing contends that newly discovered documents correctly
spell out the team’s ownership, granting Jamie McCourt a stake. The
agreement was located after a forensic analysis of other documents in
the case revealed that another copy of the 2004 agreement improperly
included an exhibit designating Frank McCourt as the Dodgers’ sole
owner.

Shockingly, Jamie’s lawyers say this is huge while Frank’s lawyers say it’s not.  It is wonderfully crazy, though, as big surprises on the eve of a trial often are.  Indeed, the only thing that would make this better is if a ragged man appeared at the back of a courtroom claiming — Martin Guerre-style — that he was the real Frank McCourt.

In other news, this day has officially been lost to baseball nutcases and their legal problems, so if Pete Rose or someone else wants to pipe up, now would be a great time to do so.

Twins reach historic home run total during 11-4 rout of White Sox

Max Kepler
AP Images
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The Twins trampled the White Sox on Friday night, cruising to a cool 11-4 lead over their division rivals and collecting their sixth double-digit win of 2019. Even more impressive, they picked up their 99th, 100th, and 101st home runs, a feat that’s rarely been matched in a team’s first 50 games of any given season.

The first homer of the night was delivered by Eddie Rosario in the third inning. Working against a single-run deficit, Rosario lifted an 0-1 fastball from the White Sox’ Reynaldo López, planting it firmly in the left field stands and evening the score, 4-4. Two batters later, Rosario’s solo home run got a sequel: a 398-footer from Miguel Sanó, this one postmarked for the upper deck in left.

In the fourth, now leading 5-4, the Twins saw a third and final homer from the bat of Max Kepler, whose center-field blast traveled a projected 397 feet to give the club a two-run advantage. Per MLB Stats, the Twins’ record — 101 homers in 50 games — stands second only to that of the 1999 Mariners, who managed to club 102 home runs before their 51st game of the season.

While the record has undoubtedly been a team effort, Rosario leads the pack with a team-best 15 homers so far this year, closely followed by C.J. Cron (13), Max Kepler (11), and Jonathan Schoop (10). Sanó, whose solo shot marked the team’s 100th home run of 2019, has just five, though there’s little doubt he’ll reach double digits before the end of the season.

According to MLB.com’s Do-Hyoung Park, the Twins also made it to an even 300 runs scored in 2019, for a satisfying average of six runs per game and a new franchise record (previous high mark: 273 runs scored in 1992). With the win, they improved to 34-16 on the year and continue to hold a comfortable eight-game lead in the AL Central.