Gregg Doyel: Having it both way with unions

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I promise you that I’m not obsessed with Gregg Doyel. I just can’t seem to let this one go.

You’ll recall this morning that Doyel stuck it to the player’s union and talked about how he wanted the Mets to crush them in the course of this Francisco Rodriguez business. The union is too powerful, Doyel thinks. It’s the tail wagging the dog. It has given millionaire players so much power that even the normal rules of supply and demand don’t apply to baseball anymore!

However, reader Steve A. alerts me to something Doyel wrote about Darrelle Revis’ holdout from the New York Jets last week that sort of messes with his anti-union narrative:

My problem is with an NFL system that leaves so many of its
players crippled, brain-damaged husks — picture an empty locust
shell, clinging to a tree — who lack the money to pay for medical
care as they grow older. So when an NFL player gets the rare chance to call his shot, I’m all for it — and Revis is Babe Ruth.

Know what would fix that system and make NFL players’ lives better? A stronger union.

And yes, I appreciate that there is a difference between a union achieving basic humane working conditions and one seeking increasingly esoteric benefits for its members. Unions can overreach and have in the past, to the point where they have harmed their members’ long term interests.

But I don’t think that can be said of the MLBPA. And I don’t think you can expect a union membership who can look to the other sports and see how crappy the players have things, relatively speaking, to stop fighting for whatever they can get from an ownership that, if they could, would treat them like chattels.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.