Comment of the Day: Manny Ramirez is no destructive force

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Today’s post about Manny Ramirez brought forth a handful of “who would want that guy bringing their team down” comments. And one comment, by reader bobr, wondering what on Earth those people are complaining about:

I wonder which example of his destructive influence you are basing
this statement on. Might it be the 11 post-seasons his teams have played
in? Or the 2 World Series championships his teams won? Or his
post-season performance to a 937 OPS?

Maybe you are thinking about the way he ruined the Dodgers in 2008
when he joined them mid-season and helped lead them to the post-season
by posting a 1232 OPS and helping them finish a 17-8 September run that
put them over the top. Or his contributions to the Dodgers winning the
division title again the following year.

I am curious to know which teams he has driven “down the tubes”
because of the “circus” that accompanies him. I can certainly understand
questions about what he has left at his age and given his injuries, but
as for his dire influence on teams he plays for, I see no compelling
evidence he has ever injured their chances to win and plenty to indicate
he was a major factor in their excellence.

Manny can be a handful, no question about it. But my sense is that, at this point in his career, his age and uncertain production are a way bigger risk than his antics.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?