K-Rod apologizes to teammates, fans and Mets brass

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Mets closer Francisco Rodriguez finally addressed his third-degree assault and second-degree harassment charges on Saturday at Citi Field.  He made a one-minute statement and did not take questions.  Here’s the transcript of that statement, via ESPN New York’s Adam Rubin:

“First of all, I’m extremely sorry,” Rodriguez said. “I want to
apologize to [owners] Fred Wilpon, Jeff Wilpon and Mr. [Saul] Katz for
the incident that happened Wednesday night. I want to apologize also to
the Mets fans, to my teammates. I want to apologize, of course, to the
front office for the embarrassing moment that I caused. I’m looking
forward to being a better person.

“Right now the plan is I’m going
to be going to [an] anger management program. And I cannot be speak no
farther about the legal stuff that we’re going through right now. I want
to apologize. Sorry.”

Was it enough?  Probably not.  But there’s no easy way to make up for his hideous and violent actions.  The anger management counseling should at least help him internally.

If you’re into the gossipy side of this story, the New York Post is reporting (with pictures!) that K-Rod has moved out of the Long Island home that he shared with his girlfriend.  It’s safe to say that relationship just took a major hit.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.