Dodgers strip Jonathan Broxton of closer's role

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Believing his hulking right-hander has lost his confidence, manager Joe Torre today removed Jonathan Broxton for the closer’s role and replaced him with left-hander Hong-Chih Kuo.
He added that Octavio Dotel would be used if a save chance materializes Friday, only because Kuo has pitched on back-to-back days.
Broxton gave up four runs in taking a blown save and a loss Thursday against the Phillies. He’s blown three saves since the All-Star break, taking losses in each of those games. He also suffered a fourth loss after entering a tie game. He has a 10.13 ERA and a 5/11 K/BB ratio in eight innings since saving the All-Star Game for the NL. He finished the first half with a 2.11 ERA and a 55/7 K/BB ratio in 38 1/3 innings.
The switch may seem like a bit of a panic move, but if it means that Broxton starts getting regular work again, it would definitely be for the best. With the Dodgers slumping, he’s made just eight appearances in the month since the All-Star Game. Including his All-Star appearance on July 13, he’s made his last nine appearances on the following days rest:
3, 4, 1, 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4
Compare that to the much more fragile Kuo. He’s made 12 appearances since July 17, coming on the following days rest:
2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 0, 2, 0
Kuo isn’t being used as a specialist, either: he’s pitched 12 2/3 innings in those dozen appearances.
So, this just might work out. Broxton can pitch every other day or more frequently until he runs off a few strong outings, and Kuo might get a bit of a break while being reserved for the ninth. That’s probably not the reasoning behind it, but it could help the Dodgers in the long run.

The Mets expect Tim Tebow to come back next year

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Mets assistant general manager John Ricco told Newsday today that he expects minor league outfielder Tim Tebow to return for a third season in professional baseball.

Tebow, 31, broke the hamate bone in his right hand while swinging a bat in late July, ending his season. It was a fairly successful season for him all things considered. After being promoted to Double-A Binghamton to start the year he hit .273/.336/.399 with six home runs, a stolen base and a .734 OPS in 298 plate appearances and made the Double-A All-Star team. That’s not the stuff of a top prospect — he strikes out far too much and the power numbers aren’t fantastic given that power would figure to be his strongest tool — but it’s pretty respectable for a guy his age and with his relative lack of baseball experience. As I said back in July, you can believe the Mets’ interest in Tebow is more marketing than baseball, but that does not preclude you from giving the guy a deserved tip of the cap for working hard and sticking it out in the bush leagues.

Assuming he does come back, the Mets are likely to start him at Triple-A Syracuse in the hopes that he’d eventually get to the bigs as a late season callup if the Mets aren’t in contention. Indeed, many believed that was the plan for him this year had he not been injured.