HBT Weekend Wrapup

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The trade deadline was redonkulous — we here at HBT had over 100 posts between Friday and Saturday — but you can at least begin to scratch the surface by checking out a handy dandy rundown of all the deals as well as our take on the deadline’s winners and losers.

Beyond trade deadline insanity:

  • What they’re saying about the Lance Berkman trade. You’ll be shocked to learn that Lupica is angry that the Yankees didn’t make a deal that would be easier for him to write about.
  • Alex Rodriguez got a day off from the chase for home run number 600 (well, he pinch hit). I continue to find it delicious that New York writers who did nothing but complain about A-Rod’s alleged me-first attitude for years are now growing increasingly annoyed that A-Rod has not achieved a purely personal statistical milestone as fast as they’d like him to.
  • 400 career stolen bases for Carl Crawford. His more valuable contribution to society: he’ll one day be the guy that those filming documentaries about the Tampa Bay Rays dynasty go to in order to talk about the “Devil Rays” era.
  • History is not on the Red Sox’ side. Which, if form holds, will just be the latest excuse Red Sox fans will use to justify launching into their patented “nobody believes in us” claptrap.

And now, without further ado, let us begin the week.

Kershaw-Sale anything but a pitcher’s duel

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World Series Game 1 was billed as a battle of aces, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw against Chris Sale of the Red Sox. Between them, they have 14 All-Star Game nominations. Kershaw has won three Cy Young Awards. Sale could his first Cy Young Award this year. Among his 10 seasons with at least 110 innings pitched, Kershaw has never posted a sub-2.92 ERA. Sale has been at 2.90 or below in each of the last two seasons. The two have combined for over 4,000 career strikeouts and both have averaged better than a strikeout per inning over their careers.

And yet Tuesday’s Game 1 was anything but a pitcher’s duel between Kershaw and Sale. Though a couple of fielding mistakes weren’t of any help to Kershaw in the first inning, Red Sox batters were squaring him up good. Of the five balls put in play in the first inning, three had exit velocities of 100 MPH or higher. Of the 12 total balls put in play against him overall, five reached triple digits in exit velo.

Kershaw gave up a pair of runs in the first, another run in the third on a J.D. Martinez double to straightaway center field, and another two in the fifth. Kershaw led off the fifth by walking Mookie Betts, then giving up a single to Andrew Benintendi, ending his night. Ryan Madson relieved Kershaw and proceeded to allow both inherited runners to score. All told, Kershaw yielded five runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts on 79 pitches in four-plus innings.

Sale, meanwhile, was on the hook for individual runs in the second, third, and fifth. Dodger hitters weren’t squaring him up quite as well as the Red Sox batters squared up Kershaw, but Sale was still more hittable than usual. Of the eight balls put in play against him, four were at least 90 MPH in exit velo. One of the runs was a no-doubt solo home run to Matt Kemp in the second. The Dodgers chased Sale in the fifth when he issued a leadoff walk to Brian Dozier. Matt Barnes relieved him allowed the inherited runner to score. Overall, Sale threw 91 pitches in four-plus innings, serving up three runs on five hits and two walks with seven strikeouts.

The game is now, as has been generally the case throughout this postseason, a battle of the bullpens.