Diamondbacks did well trading Edwin Jackson to White Sox

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Speculation that the White Sox may have acquired Edwin Jackson to “flip” him to the Nationals for Adam Dunn makes it hard to properly evaluate the deal from Chicago’s point of view yet, but there’s no need to hold off in saying Arizona did extremely well to get pitching prospects Daniel Hudson and David Holmberg for Jackson.
I was underwhelmed by the Diamondbacks’ haul for Dan Haren, but Jackson is a much different story. Some teams remain convinced that Jackson has ace potential because at times he unleashes overpowering raw stuff, which was on full display when he no-hit the Rays last month. Of course, the no-hitter also included eight walks and Jackson has been awful overall this season, going 6-10 with a 5.16 ERA and 104/60 K/BB ratio in 134.1 innings.
Jackson hasn’t pitched quite as poorly as that ugly ERA suggests, but he’s a soon-to-be 27-year-old with a 4.74 career ERA and has posted an ERA under 4.40 exactly once. He’s also owed for $8.25 million next season, which makes him an overpaid mid-rotation starter and makes unloading his contract plenty valuable for the Diamondbacks by itself. That they were able to clear Jackson’s salary off the books and get a pair of useful prospects is a great move, particularly since Hudson is a decent bet to out-perform Jackson in 2011 while making $400,000.
Hudson was so-so in 34 innings with the White Sox, but the former fifth-round pick has an excellent minor-league track record that includes a 2.79 ERA and 195/50 K/BB ratio in 174 innings between Double-A and Triple-A. He’s ready to step right into Jackson’s rotation spot and is under team control through 2015. At just 19 years old Holmberg is nowhere near the majors, but he was a second-round pick last June and Baseball America ranked him as the White Sox’s eighth-best prospect coming into the season.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.