The Mets probably aren't getting Ted Lilly

3 Comments

Joel Sherman reports that while the Mets have engaged in conversations with the Cubs about Ted Lilly, it’s now “very doubtful” that they’ll be able to do a deal for him. The sticking point: the Mets don’t want to pay the $4 million or so he’s owed for the rest of the year plus give up prospects for him.

Moreover, Sherman reports, there is no chance they can get the other pitcher about whom they’ve been inquiring — Brett Myers — because the Astros are showing no sign of wanting to move him.  In this the Astros are apparently continuing to hold the rather confusing belief that they’ll have Brett Myers next season.  There’s a mutual option for $8 million bucks, but with the kind of season Myers is having it certainly seems like he could land a multi-year deal someplace, so why would he stay in Houston?

In any event, time is not on the Mets’ side.  After last night’s demoralizing loss, they stand 7.5 back in the East and 6.5 back in the Wild Card with five teams ahead of them.  With Philly improving and Atlanta continuing to play good baseball, it’s hard to see how New York can make any headway absent landing a big fish.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.