The rift between the Mariners' coaches and the front office is very real

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We’ve heard rumblings this week that there is an increasing riff between the Mariners front office and the coaching staff, including manager Don Wakamatsu.  This came up when Chone Figgins was openly defiant of Wakamatsu in the dugout the other day yet wasn’t disciplined in any way.  Geoff Baker reports today, however, that the problems go all the way back to this past offseason.

Baker reports that the Mariners’ coaching staff begging for more offense, but that in their eyes “the front office did zero to make the offense better.”  Adrian Beltre was allowed to walk without an offer. Figgins came in but, because of other holes, was moved to second base. No one had any confidence in the Milton Bradley or Casey Kotchman trades.  They viewed the Mike
Sweeney signing as a sign of desperation. Baker also writes that “they knew Ken Griffey Jr. was done like an overcooked
Thanksgiving turkey.” A

Finally, and most damningly for front office/dugout relations, Baker writes that Wakamatsu and company were dumbfounded when, after the team got off to such a slow start, Jack Z fired hitting coach Alan Cockrell. It was the roster’s fault, the staff believed. Not Cockrell’s.

It’s striking, isn’t it, that despite all the hype surrounding the Mariners’ offseason moves — and remember back to January-March; there was a ton of hype — those moves not only proved to be poor ones in large part, but have served to create no small amount of in-house friction in Seattle.

Runnin’ a baseball team: it ain’t an easy business.

Yoenis Cespedes may need season-ending surgery

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Yoenis Cespedes is facing potential season-ending surgery, the outfielder told reporters following the Mets’ 7-5 win over the Yankees on Friday. Newly-returned from the disabled list after rehabbing a hip flexor strain and quad tightness, Cespedes appeared to be back to his old self after going 2-for-4 with a walk, base hit, and home run (his ninth of the year) during Friday’s series opener, but later remarked that he was suffering from calcification in both of his heels.

The only remedy, it appears, is a surgery that would require anywhere from 8-10 months of recovery. Should he elect to undergo the procedure now, it goes without saying that he won’t be able to return to the field before end of the regular season. On the other hand, if he postpones the surgery until the offseason, he could miss the first half of the Mets’ run in 2019.

The pain doesn’t seem to be debilitating, at least for the time being, but Cespedes added that any discomfort in his heels causes him to stand, walk, and run differently, which presents a definite problem if the club intends to ramp up his workload going forward. The Mets have yet to announce a final decision regarding any surgical procedure, though they will bench the outfielder for Saturday’s matinee against the Yankees. Following yesterday’s impressive performance, Cespedes is currently batting .262/.325/.496 on the year with 15 extra-base hits, three stolen bases, and an .821 OPS through 157 PA.