The Mets are imploding

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The losses are bad enough — New York has dropped nine of twelve games and have gone from a half-game down on June 27th to 6.5 down as of this morning — but now the clubhouse is starting to get ugly:

Alex Cora is mad as hell and not going to take it anymore.

The veteran utilityman, miffed by the laughter inside the Mets’ clubhouse after last night’s 3-2 loss to the Diamondbacks, fired venom in the direction of Mike Pelfrey and reporters who were joking at the pitcher’s locker.

Cora spouted an expletive in Spanish and raised his voice in the direction of Pelfrey and re porters as he de parted the clubhouse at Chase Field.

“A little respect, please!” Cora snapped. “They stuck it up our [butts].”

I imagine that, in light of this little outburst, people will start saying that the Mets’ chemistry was somehow disrupted recently, be it because Carlos Beltran came back or Oliver Perez is hanging around or Jeff Francoeur was benched or whatever.  Don’t buy it.

Cora’s little outburst is about a team that probably only figured to be .500 to begin with crashing back to Earth, not about some disruption in The Force or bad eggs or anything else.  It’s textbook “only winning teams have good chemistry” stuff, and it wouldn’t be rearing its head right now if the team were still winning.

Pelfrey’s laughter isn’t the problem. It’s his dead arm.  Bad chemistry isn’t hurting this team. Bad play is.  It’s that simple.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.