The judge warns Frank and Jamie McCourt: shape up or I'll order the Dodgers sold

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Right after I got done reading that giant McCourts article posted below, I read Bill Shaikin’s article in the Los Angeles Times which reports the judge in the McCourts’ divorce case saying — contrary to what Frank McCourt has been insisting for months — that the Dodgers may have to go on the block:

“The parties are unintentionally pushing the court toward an interesting
position — selling the asset which is being fought over”

That comment comes after months of wrangling over legal fees and arguments between Frank and Jamie in which each of them tried to portray themselves — at varying times — as the richer or the poorer than the other, depending on which tack suited them at the time.

As the legal experts in the article note, the judge’s comment about the team having to go up for sale were most likely a warning to Frank and Jamie to stop their bickering. A nuclear option, if you will, that probably won’t be taken but could be if everyone doesn’t start behaving first. But even if it’s unlikely, it is most certainly something the judge could order if things get bad enough.

And after everything we’ve seen with the Rangers, the last thing anyone wants to go through at this point is another acrimonious franchise sale.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.