If Adrian Beltre can't play today, why was he playing in the All-Star Game?

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UPDATE: An explanation from Francona makes this sound far less troublesome than it first appeared:

Adrian Beltre had an MRI on his sore left hamstring and manager Terry Francona said the preliminary findings were “pretty good” but decided to hold him out of the starting lineup against the Texas Rangers on Thursday night at Fenway Park. Francona replaced Beltre with Bill Hall at third base for Thursday’s four-game series opener.

“I wasn’t real comfortable playing him tonight,” Francona said. “Hopefully, he’ll go out move around, maybe be available to pinch-hit, play [Friday], that would be, for me, best case. I just think with the travel, I just didn’t have a real good feeling running him out there. Just knowing the way he plays, I didn’t want him hurting himself.”

4:25 P.M.: To review: Adrian Beltre tweaked his hamstring in Sunday’s game and was touch and go for the All-Star Game.  He went to Anaheim, though, and played in the game. Then he came back to Boston and had an MRI on the hammy this morning. The result: Beltre is out of today’s game.

Hurm. I know the All-Star Game counts and everything, but if he’s not well enough to go in a game that counts in the AL East standings, what was he doing playing in Anaheim on Tuesday?

It’s hard to parse who was wrong and who was right in the whole Jacoby Ellsbury broken ribs diagnosis thing, but if Ellsbury was right there, and if Beltre was too hurt to play in the All-Star Game but did anyway, how long until we’re justified in comparing the Red Sox’ handling of injuries to that of the Mets?

Too many unknowns for that now, however. And besides: maybe Beltre wasn’t really hurt until yesterday. I mean, those airport TCBY lines can be treacherous, so perhaps he was injured while connecting in Chicago?

Nationals promote 19-year-old prospect Juan Soto

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The Nationals recalled 19-year-old outfield prospect Juan Soto from Double-A Harrisburg on Sunday, per a team announcement. Soto is poised to become the youngest player in the league once he makes his official debut with the club, and the Nationals’ first teenager to enter the majors since Bryce Harper made his first appearance back in 2012.

Entering the 2018 season, Soto was ranked no. 2 in the Nationals’ system and 15th overall. He’s certainly lived up to the hype during his first two years of pro ball, blazing through Single-A, High-A and Double-A levels in 2018 alone. While he logged just eight games at the Double-A level prior to his promotion to the majors, he proved consistent across all three levels this spring and slashed a cumulative .362/.462/.757 with 14 home runs and a 1.218 OPS in 182 plate appearances.

It’s not entirely clear how soon or in what capacity the Nationals will utilize their youngest player, but Soto’s tear through the minors is sure to pave the road for a few opportunities on the big-league level. He’ll be available off the bench for Sunday’s series finale against the Dodgers.