Steinbrenner: business savvy even in death

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Say what you want about George Steinbrenner, but he was a hell of a businessman. From turning a tiny initial investment in the Yankees into a billion-dollar franchise, to starting his own regional sports network, rarely did the man make a business mistake.  The pattern continued even until his death:

By dying in 2010, the billionaire and long-time
New York Yankees owner’s wealth avoids the federal estate tax, likely
saving his heirs enough money to field an entire team of Alex
Rodriguezes.

Steinbrenner’s
death Tuesday came during an unplanned year-long gap in the estate tax,
the first since it was enacted in 1916. Political wrangling has
stalemated efforts in Congress to replace the tax that expired in 2009.

Because no one really knows his estate plan or the extent of his holdings, it’s hard to tell how much money he saved by going in 2010, but the back-of-the-envelope calculations in the linked article figure that, at a minumum, Big Stein’s heirs have saved $300 million+ by him passing in 2010 instead of 2009 or 2011.

Suggestion: whatever big free agent the Yankees sign this winter be given the nickname “tax break” or “death tax” or something like that.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?