Brian McCann thinks the Omar Infante critics can stuff it

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ANAHEIM, Calif. — I guess I shouldn’t have expected anything less out of Brian McCann. I think most players would stick up for their teammate in this situation, even if that teammate happened to be one of the least-deserving All-Stars in baseball history.

Nonetheless, McCann should get some kudos for a pretty admirable job attempting to lay out the case for Infante’s inclusion in tonight’s game:

“He can’t pitch and he can’t catch, but he can play every position at a high level and we get to see that every night,” McCann said. “His teammates get to see how valuable he is to us. He’s hitting .320 (.332, actually!), he’s gotten big hit after big hit, he plays great defense at every position.

“He will cherish this forever, and he deserves it. People who say someone else should have been on the team don’t know how hard it is to come to the field not knowing where you’re going to hit in the lineup, not knowing if you’re going to play third, center, right, second, short. So he deserves to be here just as much as anybody.”

And Infante said: Well I couldn’t understand much of anything, other than “very happy.”

I guess it’s time for me to take some Spanish lessons, or for someone to rustle up a translator for Omar.

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Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.