Adrian Beltre pulled with left hamstring strain

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According to the Boston’s Globe’s Peter Abraham, Red Sox third baseman Adrian Beltre left Sunday’s game against the Blue Jays with what is currently being called a “left hamstring strain.”

No matter Sunday’s result, the Red Sox will limp into the All-Star break ranked third in the American League East behind the Rays and Yankees.  They’ve had a nice string of success recently, but it is incredible how many times the Sawx have been hit with major injuries this season.   Credit goes to the front office, and guys like Daniel Nava and Darnell McDonald, for the fact that Boston can still claim playoff hopes.

Victor Martinez is on the disabled list with a fracture in his left thumb, Dustin Pedroia is out another few weeks with a broken foot, Josh Beckett is still rehabbing a back injury and Clay Buchholz has missed the last three weeks with a hamstring strain.  In fact, 10 of the players on Boston’s 40-man roster are currently on the disabled list, including veteran catcher Jason Varitek and outfielders Jacoby Ellsbury and Jeremy Hermida.  It has all been a bit tiring to cover, honestly.

If Beltre is unable to return immediately after the All-Star break, the club may need to trade for infield help or dig deeper into the farm system.  Bill Hall slid over to third base when Beltre departed on Sunday and may need to start there when the 2010 baseball season resumes next week.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.