Geoff Jenkins to retire as a Brewer. BFD.

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It’s being reported that Geoff Jenkins will announce his retirement this Friday. Jenkins will sign a one day contract in Milwaukee so he can retire as a Brewer. And thank God for that. Because it would be a travesty if history remembered Geoff Jenkins in the uniform of the, um . . . he played in Philly for a while, right? Or was it Baltimore?

Look, I don’t mean to pick on Jenkins. He was a pretty decent player for a good many years, and I’m happy that he’s getting to do what he wants to do.  I’m sure the Milwaukee fans will be happy about it to because he’s popular there. But would he be any less popular and would that history in Milwaukee be somehow sullied if he didn’t do the symbolic one-day deal? Of course he wouldn’t.

I guess it’s all harmless, but this one-day contract shtick is just so gimmicky and silly and . . . footbally.  I get it for future Hall of Famers who spent some part of their late career as nomads, but the fact that I had to actually look up to see where Jenkins played other than Milwaukee is a testament to the needlessness of this sort of thing.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.