The Yankees basically print money

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This is not a surprise because we all know the Yankees are a friggin’ cash cow, but just saying that is one thing. Seeing the real numbers is a different deal altogether. Get this report from CNBC’s Darren Rovell:

A revised bond rating issued by Standard & Poor’s today provides an
in-depth look at the New York Yankees’ 2009 revenues and it reveals that
the champions grossed $397 million in ticket revenue, including $72
million on the postseason alone.

In other words, the Yankees’ postseason ticket revenue alone brought in enough money to cover the payroll for 12 Major League teams this year.

Rovell goes on to report that the Yankees are suspected to take in about $600 million.  Even with a $200 million payroll, a luxury tax of $25 million and however much they pay in revenue sharing, they’re still able — if they choose to anyway — buy and sell more or less anyone they want.

That they have actually instituted something which approaches a budget in the past couple of years is fairly sobering.  I mean, according to Rovell, the Yankees entire season-long ticket revenue was $52 million in 1997 and $157 million in 2005.  Now that they’ve more than doubled that latter figure without raising the payroll that much, where is all that extra money going?

I have this image of a Bond villain or Cobra Commander-style island fortress being constructed somewhere. I have this image of the Yankees achieving nuclear capability before Iran does.  I’d quote that “Minnie the Moocher” lyric about a diamond car and a platinum wheel again if I hand’t just done it yesterday.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.