Ryan Dempster is not having his best day

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I think a lot of the baseball world has gotten a  jump start on their holiday weekend so there isn’t much news a-happenin’.  There are a couple of games going down, however, one of which — Reds at Cubs — I have on while I’m working.

Fun development a few minutes ago: Ryan Dempster walked Johnny Gomes and Jay Bruce, and then the bases were loaded due to an error by Mike Fontenot.  That brought up the pitcher, Bronson Arroyo.  Dempster walked him on four straight pitches.

The pitcher. On four straight. I mean, sure, Arroyo has a little bit of pop in his bat for a pitcher, but how do you not throw that guy 75-percenters right down the pike and make him put the ball in play? If anyone wonders why Lou Piniella lookes half-dazed all the time, this is the reason why.

Dempster was just pulled after giving up five runs on only two hits. He struck out nine dudes, though, so it was a very LaLooshian performance.  On some weird level I found his scuffling, off-kilter performance quite comforting as background noise on what has turned out to be a bit of a scuffling, off-kilter day.

Cody Bellinger continues to lead all All-Star vote-getters

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As you’ll recall, we have a new All-Star voting system in place this year. It’s a two-tiered system.

The “the Primary,” is underway and runs through June 21. That’s just the regular “vote for whoever you want stuff.” After it’s over, the top three vote-getters at each position will then be placed on a new ballot — “The Starter’s Election” — from which fans will then vote again during a single 28-hour period to decide who starts the All-Star Game. The results of that will be announced on June 27. The bench guys and pitchers and stuff will be chosen as usual, with full rosters announced a couple of days later.

Major League Baseball just gave us an update of who’s leading the primary. The overall leaders at each position break down thusly:

Here are the more extensive leaderboards, with the shaded names belonging to players who, if voting stopped now, would make the second round. First, the American League:

And now the National League:

Vote early, vote often.