Should the Dodgers trade Matt Kemp? No! But not for the reasons you think

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Ken Rosenthal has a bold idea for the Dodgers. After listing all the things that ail the currently-slumping boys in blue, Robo says:

General manager Ned Colletti needs to be pragmatic. He needs to be
creative. He needs to trade center fielder Matt Kemp.

This is dumb.  But maybe not for the reasons you’re thinking.

Kemp is widely and correctly viewed as one of the top talents in the game. A centerfielder with pop you can build around.  A guy like him comes up only once in a blue moon, so when you find him you hold on tight and ride him to glory. Trading him would be ridiculous, right?

Well, maybe not.  You can trade a guy like that. You can trade anyone south of the truly elite like Albert Pujols, and for all of Kemp’s charms, he’s not that kind of guy.  Maybe the Dodgers don’t want to pay for him as he decides to go through arbitration year-by-year. Maybe they sense that he peaked last year, is coasting now and is really slated for a corner outfield position where he’d be less valuable.  There are arguments to be made along those lines if one is so inclined.

But simply trading Kemp is not the stupid part of the equation. Trading him now is. As Rosenthal notes himself, Kemp is having a blah year. Kemp has regressed on defense. He has been sort of lost on the basepaths. He isn’t hitting like he’s capable of hitting.  In other words, Kemp is at an absolute low point in his value at the moment, and if people who trade things for a living, be they stocks, baseball cards or baseball players know one thing, they know that you never sell low.

For a trade of Matt Kemp to make any kind of sense at this moment, the Dodgers would have to reach the conclusion that not only is Kemp playing below what is expected of him, but that he doesn’t have any chance of bouncing back.  Because even if you hate the guy and want him gone for financial or personality reasons, you’d be much better off to wait until he’s regained his lost luster before shipping him out and selling high.

I don’t think anyone can say that Kemp’s recent struggles are the harbinger of a long decline into oblivion. Quite the opposite, actually. He’s still young, he’s still talented and he’s almost certain to return to form.

When that happens, the Dodgers will probably want to keep him around.  But even if they don’t, at least trading him then would maximize their return.

Report: Hanley Ramirez “eyed” in federal and state investigation

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Former Red Sox first baseman Hanley Ramirez is reportedly being “eyed” in an ongoing federal and state investigation, per Michele McPhee of ABC News. McPhee did not elaborate on the exact nature of the investigation itself, but provided a few more details during an interview with 98.5 The Sports Hub on Friday:

“Obviously, I know absolutely nothing about sports or Hanley Ramirez’s stats, but what I do know is crime,” McPhee said. “And there has been some reports about a FaceTime phone call that was made between a man during a car stop. After that car stop, police recovered a significant amount of drugs. And during that car stop, the suspect claimed that one of the items found in the vehicle belonged to Hanley Ramirez and then FaceTimed [Ramirez] in front of police. And that car stop coordinated with the timing of his release from the Red Sox.”

McPhee further clarified that she thinks the suspect — who was reportedly transporting 435 grams of fentanyl and a “large amount” of crack cocaine — was tied to “a sweeping federal case involving a substantial ring that’s being operated out of Lawrence, Massachusetts.”

Ramirez, the Red Sox, and Major League Baseball have all denied knowledge of any current investigation. According to the Boston Globe’s Alex Speier, Red Sox VP of media relations Kevin Gregg insisted that Ramirez had been dropped from the team for baseball reasons alone and had not been made aware of an investigation at the time of his release.

“Hanley has no knowledge of any of the allegations contained in this media report and he is not aware of any investigation,” the infielder’s agent, Adam Katz, added Friday.

The 34-year-old Ramirez was designated for assignment on May 25 and became a free agent on June 1. Prior to his release, he batted .254/.313/.395 over 195 plate appearances, 302 shy of the 497-PA threshold he would have needed to cross in order to activate his vesting option for 2019. He’s still owed the remainder of his $22 million salary for 2018.