No, Joe Torre is not the greatest manager in New York history

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I’m guessing Mike Lupica doesn’t write his own headlines, but he probably has the power to change them if they’re stupid. And the headline above today’s Lupica column in the Daily News is stupid:

New York Yankees face first showdown with Joe Torre, the greatest
manager Big Apple has ever seen

This wouldn’t be accurate even if they limited it to the Yankees, but the fact that they include all of New York makes it even more preposterous.  I mean, without even getting to the hard cases you have to put John McGraw, Joe McCarthy, and Casey Stengel ahead of Torre. I don’t know enough about Miller Huggins to be sure, but I’m guessing he has an argument. Leo Durocher is likely ahead of Torre as well, though I’ll accept arguments to the contrary.

Some of the closer calls could go either way: Billy Martin has an argument, though maybe not a great one based on New York time only. Walter Alston is the same deal inasmuch as he was more famous for his work while in L.A. (but he did win a ring in Brooklyn). Bill Terry won three pennants for the Giants, though that was really with the remnants of McGraw’s teams. Torre likely has all of them beat, but it’s not an assertion that is unassailable.

I like Torre, don’t get me wrong. But if he’s the greatest manager in New York history, Mike Lupica is a Pullitzer Prize winner and Nobel Laureate.

Dodgers to retire Fernando Valenzuela’s No. 34 this summer

Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports
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LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles Dodgers will retire the No. 34 jersey of pitcher Fernando Valenzuela during a three-day celebration this summer.

Valenzuela was part of two World Series champion teams, winning the 1981 Rookie of the Year and Cy Young awards. He was a six-time All-Star during his 11 seasons in Los Angeles from 1980-90.

He will be honored from Aug. 11-13 when the Dodgers host Colorado.

Valenzuela will join Pee Wee Reese, Tommy Lasorda, Duke Snider, Gil Hodges, Jim Gilliam, Don Sutton, Walter Alston, Sandy Koufax, Roy Campanella, Jackie Robinson and Don Drysdale with retired numbers.

“To be a part of the group that includes so many legends is a great honor,” Valenzuela said. “But also for the fans, the support they’ve given me as a player and working for the Dodgers, this is also for them.”