No, Joe Torre is not the greatest manager in New York history

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I’m guessing Mike Lupica doesn’t write his own headlines, but he probably has the power to change them if they’re stupid. And the headline above today’s Lupica column in the Daily News is stupid:

New York Yankees face first showdown with Joe Torre, the greatest
manager Big Apple has ever seen

This wouldn’t be accurate even if they limited it to the Yankees, but the fact that they include all of New York makes it even more preposterous.  I mean, without even getting to the hard cases you have to put John McGraw, Joe McCarthy, and Casey Stengel ahead of Torre. I don’t know enough about Miller Huggins to be sure, but I’m guessing he has an argument. Leo Durocher is likely ahead of Torre as well, though I’ll accept arguments to the contrary.

Some of the closer calls could go either way: Billy Martin has an argument, though maybe not a great one based on New York time only. Walter Alston is the same deal inasmuch as he was more famous for his work while in L.A. (but he did win a ring in Brooklyn). Bill Terry won three pennants for the Giants, though that was really with the remnants of McGraw’s teams. Torre likely has all of them beat, but it’s not an assertion that is unassailable.

I like Torre, don’t get me wrong. But if he’s the greatest manager in New York history, Mike Lupica is a Pullitzer Prize winner and Nobel Laureate.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.