Marlins distribute vuvuzelas to fans. Chaos ensues. Sorta.

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If you’ve kept up with the World Cup at all, you’re well aware of what a vuvuzela is by now.  The plastic air horns blown by South African natives have now infiltrated the United States, and in the least likeliest of places. 

The Marlins gave away 15,000 mini vuvuzelas on Saturday night at Sun Life Stadium and encouraged fans to blare them throughout the Feesh’s interleague game against the Rays.  It didn’t go over well with some people — namely the media attempting to craft stories about the game with constant buzzing fluttering around the park — but the fans in south Florida sure seemed to like the things.

MLB.com beat writer Joe Frisaro was in attendance, and says that Sun Life Stadium “vibrated loudly” after Marlins outfielder Chris Coghlan homered in the fourth inning.  Dan Uggla threw in earplugs at one point and first base umpire Ed Rapuano did the same.

The Marlins have averaged a major league-low 16,213 fans this season and yet still caused a ruckus.  Imagine if vuvuzelas were distributed in Yankee Stadium or Dodger Stadium, where over 43,000 fans stream in on most nights.  BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ  BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.