Not all baseball movies are "Bull Durham"

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Baseball movies are difficult beasts because baseball, by its very nature, doesn’t lend itself well to the Hollywood forumla. Rarely is there “one big game” and no amount of training montages can really convincingly turn someone into a champ. The drama of the game is just a bit too nuanced for the rah-rah, ya know?

As a result, the best baseball movies tend to be about things other than baseball. My favorite baseball movie — Bull Durham — is really a romantic comedy. “Major League” is awesome too, but it’s really a football movie — a band of misfits! The Big Game! — transplanted into baseball. It’s calling card is really the comedy, not the sports story. “Field of Dreams” is a tear jerker family drama New Age mess. It’s essential plot could have been moved along with anything. Baseball was just a giant McGuffin, really.

I mention all of this, because I’m hoping the latest baseball movie to hit production has something else going on with it too, or else it’s gonna be a real stinker:

Bradley Cooper may be a member of The A-Team now, but he could be Double-A or Triple-A in the baseball flick Disney is developing. According to The Hollywood Reporter, he’s attached to star in an untitled dramedy about an injured big league player who gets sent back to the minors — “where the only place he can find lodging is in a senior citizens’ home.”

“There,” the trade continues, “he meets an old baseball guru who helps lead him back.”

I got $100 on the guru being played by Morgan Freeman.  Anyone want any part of that action?  Yeah, I didn’t think so. Freeman could probably start running lines now before the producers even contact him it’s so obviously his role.

Any other casting suggestions to the comments, please.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.