Great Moments in Hyperbole: Ken Burns

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This link goes to a video interview of documentarianite Ken Burns, talking about leadership. Coaches and managers, specifically.

The video is fairly interesting in a big-think sort of way, but I’m having a hard time getting on board with his comparison of Joe Torre during his time with the Yankees and Abraham Lincoln. To be fair, he’s not comparing greatness or anything. Rather, he’s saying that each of them met difficult situations with a certain good humor and/or stoicism depending on what was required at the time.

Why does this break down for me? Because less than a minute before the says that, he notes how everyone in today’s culture — especially baseball — is concerned with money and structures their lives around it in important ways.

I’m not meaning to questions Torre’s bonafides or integrity here, but ask yourself: was Torre’s ability to be, as Burns puts it, “the epitome of sanity,” in New York merely a function of who he is, or did the fact that being the Yankees manager is a glamorous and lucrative gig have anything to do with the kind of garbage he put up with? Maybe it doesn’t matter a whole hell of a lot, but it seems like you had better be a bit more certain about such things before playing the Lincoln-card.

Anyway, that’s not even the most egregious thing Burns said in the clip. That came when he called Torre a “mediocre player.”  I don’t know that I’d vote for him, but on his playing merits alone, he was a borderline Hall of Famer in my view. And in the view of some other smart people who have thought hard about the matter.

Manny Machado called for interference with Orlando Arcia

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Fresh off our “Manny Machado didn’t hustle” post, here’s one about him trying a little too hard. Machado was called for interference in the bottom of the fourth inning during Monday night’s NLCS Game 3 against the Brewers at Dodger Stadium. It was actually Machado’s second attempt to interfere with Orlando Arcia during the game.

In the bottom of the second, Machado led off with a single. Cody Bellinger followed up by hitting a grounder to second baseman Travis Shaw, who fed to Arcia. Machado slid towards Arcia enough to disrupt the play, allowing Bellinger to reach first base safely. The Brewers didn’t challenge, in part because Arcia didn’t attempt a throw.

Fast forward to the bottom of the fourth. Machado again leads off and again reaches base, this time with a walk. Bellinger hits another grounder. First baseman Jesús Aguilar snags the ball and fires to Arcia covering the second base bag. Machado slides into second base and reaches out with his right hand to mess with Arcia’s throw to first base. It succeeds, as Arcia’s throw skips past first base towards the dugout. Brewers manager Craig Counsell challenged the call, alleging slide interference (the “Chase Utley rule”). The umpires reviewed the play and agreed that Machado did indeed interfere with Arcia, so Bellinger was called out. What made Machado’s effort even worse is that Bellinger would’ve reached easily regardless, so there was no need to interfere with Arcia.

The Dodgers trail the Brewers 1-0 through the first half of the game. The Brewers got their run early thanks to an RBI double by Ryan Braun off of Walker Buehler in the top of the first. Jhoulys Chacín has pitched excellently for the Brewers thus far.