Columnist: Stephen Strasburg shouldn't strike so many guys out

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I suppose this was inevitable. When you tire of superlatives to describe Stephen Strasburg’s game, you go contrary and try to find a fault.  And I suppose there are faults to be found, because no pitcher is perfect. But this one from Tom Boswell of the Washington Post seems like a bit of a stretch:

Relax, all right? Don’t try to strike everybody out. Strikeouts are
boring! Besides that, they’re fascist. Throw some ground balls – it’s
more democratic.

OK, that’s me paraphrasing, but that’s basically what he’s saying. Too many of his outs are by strikeout, more strikeouts usually leads to more pitches, and more pitches are bad for the Savior.

I guess I’m having a hard time seeing the problem as long as his pitch counts are monitored and as long as he doesn’t appear to be altering his approach to a given hitter in an effort to simply get more strikeouts for their own sake.  But hey, if they can’t hit the ball, what’s the harm in letting him throw it by them?

And lest we forget, Strasburg’s first two starts came against Cleveland and Pittsburgh.  I have this feeling that his future opponents will manage a little more contact off the kid.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?