What's with the Adrian Beltre head rub thing?

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I realize this is over a week old and that Sox fans were all over it, but it completely eluded my radar, so it likely eluded the radar of others as well:

After Adrian Beltre clubbed a home run in Friday night’s game,
television cameras caught him in the dugout taking what looked like a
serious swing at catcher Victor Martinez. Turns out, he was taking a swing, and there was a perfectly good
explanation – if you’re someone who doesn’t like having their head
touched.

Martinez and Beltre are friends, but in the home run celebration,
Martinez touched the top of Beltre’s head — and the third baseman said
that’s something his fellow players know he absolutely hates. Beltre
reacted immediately, lashing out at Martinez.

The two were smiling throughout, but Beltre definitely put some force
behind his good-natured swing at Martinez.

“He knows I don’t like that. I don’t like anybody to touch my head,
and he knows it. He does it on purpose. So I’m not responsible for
everything that happens after that happens,” Beltre said.

Doesn’t saying something like this basically guarantee you a lifetime of head rubbing? It’s the equivalent of “psycho” from “Stripes” telling the platoon that he doesn’t like being called Francis.

Anyway, this would be a lot more interesting, I think, if the Sox were still struggling. Someone could legitimately get cold-cocked.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

AP Photo
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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.