The Yankees are abusing Baltimore. And That's OK

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The Yankees are 37-22.  After last night that record is comprised of a 10-1 mark against the Orioles, a 4-0 mark against the Indians and a 5-1 record against the Twins.  Against everyone else the Bombers are under .500.

I would not be at all surprised to hear New York talk radio fret about this sort of thing at some point because New York talk radio is always looking for something to fret about, but it’s worth remembering that this is not at all uncommon.  Indeed, it’s usually the case that the best teams beat the living tar out of the worst ones and basically break even against the better teams (and, I suppose in the case of the Twins, beat up on those good teams whose number one simply seems to have).  The Yankees did this last year and managed to win a World Series. They also did this in their previous championship year — 2000 — going 42-43 against .500+ opponents en route to a 87-74 record.

And it’s not just the Yankees. As Darren Everson pointed out in the Wall Street Journal last year, the last time a team won a World Series while doing better than breaking even against .500+ teams was 1995 when the Braves did it.  Everson also noted that the Angels frequently kick the snot, relatively speaking, out of good teams and they usually get a first round playoff exit for thier troubles.  All the other recent champs have cruised against the pushovers and done no better than hold their own against the toughies.

So while some people may want to see the Yankees play better against the Rays and Red Sox of the word, this pattern is just dandy. At least if you’re not an Orioles or an Indians fan.

Report: Angels to sign Cody Allen

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Angels and reliever Cody Allen are in agreement on a one-year contract, pending a physical. The value of the contract is not yet known.

Allen, 30, was looking for an opportunity to close and the Angels can certainly provide that. He will likely be the favorite to break camp as the closer. 2018 was the roughest year of his career, however, as he finished with a 4.70 ERA, 27 saves, and a 80/33 K/BB ratio in 67 innings. Among Allen’s six full seasons, his 27.7 strikeout rate and 11.4 percent walk rate represented career-worsts. FanGraphs also shows him losing nearly a full MPH on his average fastball velocity.

The Angels lost closer Keynan Middleton to Tommy John surgery early last season and he likely won’t return until the second half of the 2019 season. Blake Parker, who handled save situations in Middleton’s place, was non-tendered by the Angels in November and ended up signing with the Twins. The closer’s role is Allen’s to lose, it seems.