The Pirates should not go down without a fight

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This post over at the Pirates’ blog WHYGAVS is being rewtweed and reposted all over the Internet today because of a brilliant “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” riff on the whole Stephen Strasburg debut. And it is brilliant, so go check it out.  But I like it much more for this passage from its author, Pat Lackey:

This is the most anyone besides Pirate fans will notice the Pirates all year. The Pirates are currently the national afterthought, the joke of a team that’s been sacrificed to the debut of the most hyped pitching prospect in the history of baseball. No one expects the Pirates to do anything in this game besides strike out nine or ten times, go back to the locker room with their heads between their tails, and give the huge assembled scores of media some nice quotes about how awesome Strasburg is.

And that’s all people should expect from the Pirates tonight. But no one wants to be a sacrificial lamb, and there’s going to be a lot of pride on the line for the guys in black and gold tonight. I sure as hell hope they go down with a fight.

Baseball is a team sport with a tough freakin’ learning curve.  As I said this morning, I wish nothing but the best for Stephen Strasburg and I hope he has a great career. But at the same time, I wouldn’t mind it in the least if the Pirates — who are drawing comparisons to the Washington Generals for cryin’ out loud — lay the lumber to the kid a little bit to remind everyone that baseball is not best defined by huge, media-crazy moments like tonight’s game.  It’s a game defined by the daily grind, stamina, perseverance and learning from one’s mistakes.

Go Strasburg, but go Pirates too.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.