Aroldis Chapman was impressive: but not in the way I expected

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Aroldis Chapman and the Louisville Bats rolled into beautiful downtown Columbus, Ohio last night. I couldn’t miss that so I called my friend Mark — a big Reds fan — and headed on down to the park to catch the game. We got through the gate and, being consummate professionals, used every trick in the book to move up from our assigned seats to a choice location right behind home plate. 

After his last outing in which he was clocked at 103 m.p.h. I fully expected to be dazzled by Chapman’s fastball.  I was in for a bit of a surprise.

Not that he disappointed in the early going. Chapman had some serious heat in the first couple of innings, hitting 99 and 98 a few times in the first and uncorking one pitch at 100 m.p.h. in the second. It was a crazy atmosphere in the park too, with almost no one actually watching the ball being caught after it crossed the plate — all eyes were on the radar readouts down the first and third base lines.  When he hit 100 the crowd let out a collective “whoa!”

But then a funny thing happened: Chapman slowed down.  Indeed, for the rest of the game he was consistently at 93-94 m.p.h., only rarely ticking it up any higher.  When his velocity first declined Mark and I wondered if something was wrong with him. But then it became apparent: Chapman wasn’t throwing. He was pitching.

Starting in the third inning Chapman went to work with his offspeed stuff.  And it worked.  Clippers’ batters were obviously amped for the gas, and I can’t recall seeing guys so far out in front of pitches as these guys were.  Chapman occasionally got too enamored with his changeup — at one point he threw a few too many in a row which, thankfully for him, only led to loud outs — but overall he was masterful.

When it was all said and done Chapman had thrown seven innings, allowing two runs and four hits. He walked three and struck out five on 88 pitches.  The bullpen blew the game for him so he didn’t get the win, but it was a strong performance.

The biggest question I had leaving the park was how much of last night’s outing was a function of Chapman making a conscious effort to mix it up and to be efficient and how much of it was a function of him just not having his best gas?  That’s not my problem, I suppose. For my part I’ll just note that it was nice to see Chapman — who some Reds fans are clamoring to come up and help plug holes in the bullpen — come out and give a mature and complete performance.

A few more of those and he’ll be doing it in Cincinnati.

José Abreu undergoes lower abdominal surgery, expected out two weeks

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White Sox first baseman José Abreu underwent lower abdominal surgery on Tuesday, Daryl Van Schouwen of the Chicago Sun-Times reports. It was an outpatient procedure that is expected to keep him away from baseball activity for two weeks.

Abreu, 31, was held out of Tuesday’s lineup, his first day off in more than two months. This season, Abreu has hit a productive .272/.331/.491 with 22 home runs and 78 RBI in 526 plate appearances.

The White Sox will likely play Matt Davidson at first base and put Daniel Palka at DH while Abreu is out.