Jose Lima passes after tragic heart attack

35 Comments

Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes reports that former major league pitcher Josa Lima has passed away at his home in Los Angeles, California due to a massive heart attack.

“Lima Time” was last spotted in the majors back in 2006, when he allowed 22 runs in four starts with the Mets.  He played in the big leagues for 13 years and always brought an unmistakable flair to the mound.  Some may have seen Lima’s animated pitching persona as a little over the top, but there’s no doubting that it was always sincere.  He clearly loved the game and tried continuing his career at a few different levels once Major League Baseball passed him by. 

The right-hander left the league with an 89-102 lifetime record, a 5.26 career ERA and a 1.39 career WHIP, pitching for the Tigers, Astros, Royals, Dodgers and Mets.  He was 37 on Sunday when he passed away.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.