Mike Lupica is happy to have a new reason to rip A-Rod

16 Comments

Thumbnail image for Alex Rodriguez homer.jpgFun times in the Daily News today, as Mike Lupica takes A-Rod to task over the Dr. Galea story, sarcastically asserting that, apparently now that Rodriguez is no longer a post-season choker and all of that, apparently he doesn’t feel the need to come clean. Many of you may agree with him.

But read the column closely, and it’s quite obvious that Lupica is not complaining about A-Rod’s reticence with law enforcement or Major League Baseball or the Yankees.  He’s angry because A-Rod won’t talk to the press.  Really, go look: his big beef is that A-Rod dodged a question about the Galea charges before yesterday’s game, and from that he launches into a thousand-word piece, at the end of which he actually lists the questions he wants A-Rod to answer.

Which is rather crazy.  I mean, I have no idea what the relationship was between Dr. Galea and A-Rod and I have no clue what Rodriguez was and wasn’t prescribed.  But I do know that federal charges are coming down against Galea, and in those charges athletes are being called out. Anonymously for now, but not for long.  Clearly, at some point, those athletes named will be required to testify about Dr. Galea, likely under some sort of immunity deal, but certainly under penalty of perjury.

In light of this, if A-Rod answered the questions Lupica had for him, he’d be putting himself at a significantly higher risk of legal jeopardy.  Any lawyer in the country would advise their client not to give press conferences about such topics given what’s happening right now.

A-Rod’s decision not to answer Lupica or any other reporter’s questions about the subject is a very wise one, borne of savvy legal advice, not, as Lupica believes, some arrogance resulting from Rodriguez’s newfound status as postseason hero and clutch god. But it’s Lupica, and even if he realizes this he’s going to ignore it

Why? Because that’s just what he does.

Rob Manfred blames Bryce Harper for going unsigned

Bryce Harper
Mark Brown/Getty Images
9 Comments

Commissioner Rob Manfred spoke with the media today. Naturally, he was asked various questions about the landscape of the sport, given that superstars Manny Machado and Bryce Harper remain unsigned as spring training begins. Per The Athletic’s Brittany Ghiroli, Manfred said that he thinks the free agent market will begin to move once spring training exhibition games begin. Manfred also said that Harper’s camp suggesting that he wants $400 million back in 2016 was “an impediment” to discussions throughout the offseason.

No word on why Machado is also as yet unsigned, as he did not have a reported $400 million ask.

Manfred’s job is to look out for ownership, so it’s not surprising to see him point the finger at Harper. Consider:

Manfred’s comment comes just months after the Red Sox won 108 regular season games and the World Series with baseball’s largest payroll. And ongoing evidence that there is indeed a positive correlation between dollars spent and team success. We often hear justification for tanking/rebuilding because the Cubs and Astros did it and won championships because of it. When the Red Sox use financial muscle to win a championship, it’s crickets.

Manfred didn’t stop there, however.

An easy way to get baseball’s “glow” back would be for two of the game’s best and most popular players to be in uniform playing games. The first spring training exhibition game will be played on February 22, so it’s not looking like that’s going to happen anytime soon.

Baseball’s “glow” would also come back if more teams were actively trying to win. Instead, one-third of the league is “rebuilding” or otherwise coasting on revenue-sharing. For fans of the Rangers, Orioles, Royals, and Marlins — to name a few — the outcomes of their favorite teams’ seasons have already been decided, so what is there to get excited about?