Comment of the Day: Jamie Moyer and Starlin Castro

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Cap Anson.jpgI have the best readers on the planet.

In this morning’s recaps I made a joke about how the 47 year-old Jamie Moyer pitching to the 20 year-old Starlin Castro linked Castro directly to 19th century legend Cap Anson. I was just being silly with that, of course.

But reader Luis took it as a challenge and did the actual linking of Castro and Anson:

  • Starlin Castro played with Koyie Hill for the 2010 Chicago Cubs
    Exclude Koyie Hill
  • Koyie Hill played with Rickey Henderson for the 2003 Los Angeles
    Dodgers Exclude Rickey Henderson
  • Rickey Henderson played with Phil Niekro for the 1985 New York Yankees
    Exclude Phil Niekro
  • Phil Niekro played with Warren Spahn for the 1964 Milwaukee Braves
    Exclude Warren Spahn
  • Warren Spahn played with Tony Cuccinello for the 1942 Boston Braves
    Exclude Tony Cuccinello
  • Tony Cuccinello played with Edd Roush for the 1931 Cincinnati Reds
    Exclude Edd Roush
  • Edd Roush played with Nixey Callahan for the 1913 Chicago White Sox
    Exclude Nixey Callahan
  • Nixey Callahan played with Cap Anson for the 1897 Chicago Colts

God, I love that kind of stuff. You can do it with anyone.  I’m not quite sure who the Kevin Bacon figure is in the baseball version of this game, but I’ve always found Niekro and Hoyt Wilhelm to be insanely useful in this regard.

UPDATE:  lar reminds us in the comments that Baseball-Reference.com has an app for that.

UPDATE IIJay at Fack Youk covered this ground last year and found that (a) Warren Spahn is the real Rosetta Stone for this game; and (b) Kevin Bacon couldn’t carry Dennis Hopper’s jock when it comes to the degrees game.  Definitely check it out.

Roy Halladay won’t wear Blue Jays or Phillies cap on Hall of Fame plaque

Mitchell Leff/Getty Images
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In 2016, late pitcher Roy Halladay was asked if he would prefer to wear a Blue Jays or Phillies cap on his plaque if he were to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Per Mark Zwolinski of the Toronto Star, Halladay said, “I’d go as a Blue Jay.” He added, “I wanted to retire here, too, just because I felt like this is the bulk of my career.”

Obviously, circumstances have changed as Halladay tragically died in a plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida in November 2017. Halladay was elected to the Hall of Fame yesterday, becoming the first player to be posthumously elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility since Christy Mathewson in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year.

Today, Arash Madani reports that Halladay’s wife Brandy said her late husband will not wear a cap with the emblem of either team on his plaque. He will instead be portrayed with a generic baseball cap. Brandy said, “He was a Major League Baseball player and that’s how we want him to be remembered.”

Halladay spent 16 years in the majors, 12 with the Blue Jays and four with the Phillies. He meant a lot to both teams. He was a six-time All-Star and won the AL Cy Young Award in 2003 with the Jays. He won the NL Cy Young in 2010 with the Phillies and was a runner-up for the award in 2011, making the All-Star team both years and helping the Phillies continue their streak of reaching the postseason, which lasted from 2007-11. Halladay authored a perfect game in the regular season against the Marlins and a no-hitter in the postseason against the Reds as a member of the Phillies in 2010 as well.

In aggregate, Halladay won 203 games with a 3.38 ERA and 2,117 strikeouts in 2,749 1/3 innings during his storied 16-year career which was unfortunately cut a bit short by injuries.