New York high schoolers to start having their pitch counts monitored

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Missed this from yesterday, but file this under good ideas: New York City’s Public Schools Athletic League has agreed to have coaches keep track of pitch counts of high school pitchers, submit them with game
results and post them on the league’s Web site.

Sure, they had to be threatened by the city council to do it, and there is no binding rule in place to limit pitch counts, but as with most things, information is power. If people know that a 16 year-old kid was left in to throw 150 pitches some night — which happens in high school baseball all across the country each and every day — pressure will mount to stop it.

Not that this is a completely black and white issue. There is a lot of interesting stuff in the article about just how darn hard it is to find kids who can throw the ball over the plate, which causes many teams to lean too hard on those who can.

Still, that’s no excuse to kill a kid’s arm, and when it comes to this sort of thing, knowledge is power.

Juan Soto went back in time to homer against the Yankees

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On Monday evening, the Yankees and Nationals resumed a game from May 15 that was suspended due to inclement weather. The game was suspended after the top of the sixth inning with a 3-3 tie. That, and the next day’s game, were rescheduled for today, a month and three days later.

An interesting thing happened in that month and three days: Juan Soto made his major league debut. Soto, at the time of his promotion, was the minor league leader in home runs. He took his first major league at-bat on May 20, pinch-hitting in a game against the Dodgers. He struck out. He got his first start the next day against the Padres, going 2-for-4 with a home run and three RBI.

When Soto stepped to the plate on Monday evening in the bottom of the sixth inning, technically he is considered to have done so on May 15. As fate would have it, he absolutely obliterated a 97 MPH fastball from Chad Green for a two-run home run. So he homered in his major league debut after having already made his major league debut. Does Soto have a DeLorean? On May 15, Soto was batting third for Double-A Harrisburg. He went 3-for-4 (all singles) with an RBI.

Michael Kay, citing the Elias Sports Bureau on the YES broadcast, said that it still considers Soto’s debut as having occurred on May 20, but he will have an asterisk denoting May 15’s suspended game. His first major league hit and RBI are still considered to have come on his three-run homer against the Padres. So there’s that.