Starlin Castro makes history in major league debut

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Starlin Castro.jpgBefore Friday’s game against the Reds, Cubs manager Lou Piniella said the club wasn’t asking top prospect Starlin Castro to provide a “spark” for the team. Well, Castro must have missed that memo.

On Friday, the 20-year-old Dominican became the first player in major league history to drive in six runs in their major league debut. The previous record-holder — the immortal Ben Grieve — drove in five runs on September 3, 1997.

Castro connected for a three-run home run in his first at-bat in the second inning — the third player to do it this season (Jason Heyward, Luke Hughes) — and the sixth in Cubs history. The last Cubs player to accomplish the feat was pitcher Jim Bullinger on June 8, 1992. If that wasn’t enough, Castro later added a three-run triple in the fifth.

Cubs right-hander Carlos Silva summed the youngster’s night up pretty well:

“Unbelievable. I was hitting behind him, looking at everything he was
doing. I was like: ‘Wow.'”

I’m a little worried that short-term expectations could get out of control after a historic night like this, but the North Siders and their fans have a homegrown player to be very excited about. And that’s always a good thing for this game.

Ichiro wore a fake mustache to sneak into the Mariners’ dugout

Associated Press
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Ichiro Suzuki is now a Mariners employee and, as such, he’s not allowed to sit in the dugout during a game. That’s for coaches and players only.

He knows that, too. Indeed, on the day Ichiro announced his sorta-retirement, he talked about how it was going to be hard not to be down on the field with the other players. He even made a ridiculous joke about how, “[he] can’t say for certain that maybe [he] won’t put on a beard and glasses and be like Bobby Valentine and be in the dugout.”

In related news, this mysterious stranger was seen by an Associated Press photographer in the Mariners dugout during the first couple of innings of the M’s-Yankees game:

(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)

No beard, but I guess that joke was not very ridiculous after all. Either way, by the end of the second inning — poof — he was gone.

Obviously, when something interesting like this happens you mustache an expert for their opinion on the matter. To that end, the Associated Press reached Bobby Valentine, who famously did the same thing after an ejection way back in 1999, for comment:

“He was perfect. I never would have known it was him.”

Valentine was suspended for two games and fined $5,000. I’m assuming Ichiro won’t get hit quite as hard given that he wasn’t defying an umpire’s authority, but even if he does have to pay a fine, he’ll likely do so willingly.