White Sox, Mariners shopping for offense

7 Comments

According to ESPN’s Buster Olney, the White Sox and Mariners have been active in early trade talks, with both teams looking for offense.
It shouldn’t come as much of a surprise in either case. The White Sox have gotten lucky with Andruw Jones, but Juan Pierre has struggled in the leadoff spot and Mark Kotsay, who appeared likely to play more than Jones initially, has been a complete void through the first month.
The Mariners went for sentimentality over sense when they re-signed Ken Griffey Jr. over the winter. There was little reason to think he’d be this bad — he’s hit .212/.268/.242 with no homers and five RBI through 66 at-bats — but there were plenty of better choices to fill the DH spot in Seattle. The Milton Bradley-for-Carlos Silva swap, which was universally acclaimed, also couldn’t have worked out any worse.
There aren’t many obvious trade candidates available for either team right now, though. The Royals should be glad to part with Jose Guillen if anyone is willing to take on the remainder of his $12 million salary for this year, but since they are the Royals, there’s no way of telling if that’s really the case. Also, Guillen has played just one game in the field this year, and both the White Sox and Mariners would prefer someone who could play an outfield corner with some regularity.
The Marlins, with Mike Stanton on the way, could make Cody Ross available in a month or so, but only if both Chris Coghlan and Cameron Maybin step up their games. The Orioles should be willing to talk about Luke Scott, since they’re going nowhere and he doesn’t figure into their long-term plans. Jody Gerut is expendable in Milwaukee and is a useful part-time player.
There’s also free agency as an option. Of course, if either team wanted to try Jermaine Dye, the move would be done already. Dye was always open to returning to Chicago, and he listed Seattle as a favored destination last month. Gary Sheffield is another veteran waiting for a call. Plus, there’s the talented-yet-troubled Elijah Dukes still looking for work.

Two great Mariano Rivera stories

Getty Images
2 Comments

In addition to getting unanimous support from Hall of Fame voters, Mariano Rivera’s election is getting universal praise from fans and the baseball community. I mean, at least it seems so. If you see someone out there in the wild really mad that Rivera was elected, please, let me know. But don’t approach such people. They’re probably dangerously imbalanced and might cause harm to you.

From what we’ve seen, anyway, there is no one who doesn’t love Rivera and his election. That love has come out in the form of anecdotes people are sharing this morning. I’ve seen two that made me particularly happy. One “ha ha” happy, the other “aww” happy.

The “ha ha” comes from Michael Young, who shared the ballot with Rivera this year and whose Rangers actually beat Rivera’s Yankees in the 2010 ALCS. Not that they had much success against Mo:

Now the “aww.” It comes from Danny Burawa, who had a few major league cups of coffee after coming up in the Yankees system. From his Instagram last night:

In 2012, in the middle of my first big league spring training, I tore my oblique during a game (I wound up missing the whole season). First cuts hadn’t been made and the Yankees let me stick around to rehab with the big leaguers for a few days. The next day, after finishing my rehab, I returned to the locker room which was totally empty. I’m sitting at my locker getting ready to go home when in walks Mariano Rivera. Considering I was a nobody A-baller, I kept my eyes down on my feet and minded my own business. Next thing I know, he’s in the chair next to me, telling me his story, about failing as a starter, about an injury he had when he was younger, about how the setbacks we think are fatal usually end up as speed bumps on a longer, grander road. This is the greatest of all time, taking the time to cheer up a nobody, for no other reason than he thought it was the right thing to do. Great pitcher, greater human, congratulations Mo!

People use that “great player, better person” construction a lot. I often roll my eyes when I hear it because it’s pretty subjective and, I suspect, the “better person” part can’t be vouched for outside the subject’s friend or peer group. Doesn’t sound that way with Rivera, though. He simply sounds like a prince of a guy.