Wilson Ramos replaces Joe Mauer and makes some history with four-hit debut

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Joe Mauer is out for at least a few days with a heel injury, so the Twins called up 22-year-old prospect Wilson Ramos from Triple-A and he went 4-for-5 against the Indians yesterday in his big-league debut.
Ramos ranked No. 3 on my list of the Twins’ top prospects heading into the season, but was hitting just .179 with a poor 15/3 K/BB ratio in 16 games at Triple-A prior to the call-up. That makes his 4-for-5 debut pretty surprising, but even more amazing is that he’s the first player in 12 years to have a four-hit debut.
Better yet, I’m guessing 99.9 percent of baseball fans couldn’t name the last guy to do it. I certainly couldn’t, at least not before diving into Baseball-Reference.com for the answer. Go ahead, take your best guess. OK, ready? The answer is …
Derrick Gibson.
Exactly.
Gibson made his big-league debut for the Rockies on September 8, 1998 and went 4-for-4 in an 11-10 win over the Marlins. At the time he was only 23 years old, but Gibson played a grand total of just 16 more games in the majors, going 10-for-45 (.222), and was finished as a big leaguer the next season. He went on to spend 14 seasons in the minors before retiring in 2006.
Along with Ramos and Gibson, the other four-hit debuts belong to: Delino DeShields, Bill Bean, Kirby Puckett, Ted Cox, Mack Jones, Willie McCovey, Spook Jacobs, Cecil Travis, Russ Van Atta, Art Shires. That’s a pretty mixed bag, because for every star like Puckett, McCovey, and Travis there’s a Gibson, Bean, Cox, and Jacobs who essentially did nothing in the majors after their big debut.

Congratulations Justin Turner!

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Baseball is a young man’s game. Whereas, a few short years ago, teams went into battle with a lot of guys with ten or twelve years of experience under their belt, these days such veterans are a dying breed. Whether you chalk it up to teams favoring youth because youth is less expensive, the game simply favoring younger, more athletic players, the decline in PED use among ballplayers or some combination of all three, the fact is that it’s better to be 23 in Major League Baseball these days than 33.

But Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner is an exception.

Turner is 33 — he turns 34 in November — yet he remains at or near the top of his game. It’s been a shorter season than usual for him due to an injury that cost him all of April and part of May, but his production when healthy remains at a near-MVP level. He’s hitting .318/.413/.525 on the year, and his return coincided with the Dodgers shaking off their early-season doldrums. Now, with his help, they are on the verge of yet another NL West title.

Not only that, but he’s doing that while holding down a second job!

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Way to hustle, Justin!