U2 is messing with the baseball schedule

21 Comments

Bono.jpgI’m sure Bono didn’t mean to bug ya, but he’s doing it all the same:

Don’t know whether or not Bono favors the designated hitter rule, but
based on U2’s summer concert tour, they’re definitely American
Leaguers.

The band is playing Angels Stadium
(June 6-7), the Oakland Coliseum (June 16) and Toronto’s Rogers Center
(July 3) before, finally, landing in NL Florida’s Landshark Stadium (or
whatever they’re calling it now, on July 9). And it wreaked havoc with the 2010 schedule.

The reason it’s wreaking havoc: U2 needs a park for 10 days to simply build and tear-down the stage setup for a single night’s concert. As a result, the Angels have a fourteen-game road trip in their future come June.

All of which would be fine if U2 was any good anymore, but ever since they decided that nostalgia was more important than being interesting [cough!] “All That You Can’t Leave Behind” [cough!] they’ve been adrift on a sea of awfulness. I mean, “Pop” was no great shakes, but at least they were trying something.

Where was I? Oh yeah, baseball. 

This is not unprecedented of course. As the linked article notes, the Astros went on the road for a month in 1992 when the Republican National Convention was held in the Astrodome. That was a 26-game road trip, during which the Astros went 12-14.

But the 1992 Astros weren’t exactly contenders like the Angels are. They finished the year 17 games out, and even if you’re generous to the point of ridiculousness, you can’t pin anything that happened to the baseball team on the convention apart from annoyance.

If the Angels finish a game or two out of the money this year, though, fans have my permission to burn copies of “How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb” in the streets.

That is, if they hadn’t done so already on general principle.

Noah Syndergaard to disabled list due to hand, foot, and mouth disease

Mike Stobe/Getty Images
4 Comments

MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo reports that Mets starter Noah Syndergaard will be placed on the 10-day disabled list because he contracted hand, foot, and mouth disease. The ailment is more common in children than adults and is caused by Coxsackievirus A16 or Enterovirus 71. According to James Wagner of the New York Times, it is believed that Syndergaard picked up hand, foot, and mouth disease working at a youth camp during the All-Star break.

Syndergaard, 25, started on Friday. He pitched well but lasted only five innings, throwing 84 pitches, because he had diminished velocity and felt tired. He yielded a run on eight hits with no walks and four strikeouts. It was his second start since returning from a DL stint (strained ligament in right index finger) that kept him out between May 26 and July 12.

The Mets expect Syndergaard to need only the minimum 10 days to recover. Corey Oswalt will temporarily take Syndergaard’s spot in the rotation.

In 13 starts this season, Syndergaard owns a 2.89 ERA with 83 strikeouts and 15 walks in 74 2/3 innings.