Sports Illustrated Writer: contract the Pirates!

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Paul Daugherty, usually of the Cincinnati Enquirer, but writing here for Sports Illustrated, saw just about all he needed to see from the Pirates last week:

In the seven days between April 20 and 26, the Pirates were outscored
72-12. Not by the Yankees, or even the Jets, but by the Brewers and the
Houston Astros. This isn’t Major League Baseball in any way, except
embarrassment.

Break up the Pirates.

No, really.
Dismantle them player by player. Melt them down. Paperweights and
doorstops for everyone.

Daugherty bases his argument on more than just the shellacking at the hands of the Brewers and Astros, of course. The 17 years of futility enter into it, as well as charges that the Pirates don’t spend their revenue sharing money to actually make the team better.

Which doesn’t exactly square with the union’s position, which I wrote about last week.  The union believes that the Pirates are not, like the Marlins, squandering money to make the team better or otherwise acting poorly as an organization. Sure, that’s just one group’s opinion of the matter, but doesn’t it follow that the first ones to scream if the Pirates were mismanaging the store would be the union?

And as for those 17 years, the vast majority of them occurred under different ownership and different management.  It’s cold comfort to Pirates fans who can’t necessarily be expected to care what regime is presiding over the bad on-the-field product, but Daugherty knows that different people are in charge now, and unless he’s in radical disagreement with most people who know a little bit about the subject, he has to acknowledge that things are better now than they were just a few short years ago.

I know it’s bleak in Pittsburgh, but it’s not hopeless, and this brand of overreaction doesn’t seem to reflect what’s really going on in the organization.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.