MLB denies Twitter crackdown, but facts say otherwise

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After posting my story last night about MLB.com writers being banned from using Twitter for non-baseball topics and MLB players being told their tweets will be monitored, I was contacted by a spokesperson for MLB who essentially said I was 100 percent wrong. In fact, he went so far as to say my story was so “factually inaccurate” it had the good folks at MLB “mystified by all of this.”
Prior to posting the story I spoke to multiple MLB and MLB.com employees, each of whom made it very clear that the beat reporters were told to cease using their current Twitter accounts for anything other than coverage of the team. Several MLB.com writers even made announcements to that effect on their Twitter pages, although within hours those messages had (coincidentally, I’m sure) been deleted.
Beyond that, it was the talk of press boxes across baseball last night, with dozens of non-MLB.com beat writers tweeting about the fact that their MLB.com colleagues could no longer post non-baseball notes on Twitter. White Sox third baseman Mark Teahen also spoke to Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times about the players angle. In other words, the notion that my story could have possibly “mystified” anyone at MLB was absurd and struck me as an attempt to mislead.
Eventually the MLB spokesperson pulled back the reins a bit on the denial, but still insisted that no policy changes have been made. That flies in the face of everything I was told by multiple sources involved, all the notes posted on Twitter last night by both MLB.com and non-MLB.com reporters discussing the issue, and the fact that several MLB.com beat writers chose last night to create new, personal Twitter accounts.
I asked MLB for an official statement, but they refused and simply continued to insist my story was inaccurate. If and when they’d like to clarify things on the record I’m willing to clarify, update, or correct my reporting, but in the meantime what’s going on here seems rather obvious and I’m more than comfortable letting things speak for themselves.
UPDATE: In addition to deleting any tweets about the Twitter ban issue, MLB.com writers have now deleted their posts about creating new, personal Twitter accounts. Just another coincidence, I’m sure.

Report: Yankees, Reds finalizing trade for Sonny Gray

Sonny Gray
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Barring physicals and roster reshuffling, the Yankees and Reds are all but ready to finalize a deal involving right-hander Sonny Gray, Fancred’s Jon Heyman reported Saturday. The exact return has not been confirmed, but Heyman hears that the Yankees will receive top infield prospect Shed Long and a draft pick in exchange for Gray, with an as-yet unnamed third player possibly involved as well.

According to several reports earlier in the day, negotiations came down to the wire as the Yankees first had their eye on the Reds’ no. 6 prospect, 22-year-old catcher Tyler Stephenson. The Reds ultimately elected to hang on to Stephenson and send Long to New York, as they currently have a greater need for catching depth and weren’t expected to be able to provide a full-time role for the infielder in 2019. Long, 23, is ranked seventh in the Reds’ system and appears to be nearing his MLB debut after batting .261/.353/.412 with 12 homers and a .765 OPS across 522 PA at Double-A Pensacola last year.

Gray figures to step into a prominent role within the Reds’ rotation, which is likely to be a mix of recently-acquired left-hander Alex Wood and right-handers Tanner Roark, Luis Castillo, Anthony DeSclafani, and Tyler Mahle, among several others. Despite Gray’s struggle to remain productive on the mound — he’s three years removed from his only All-Star campaign and turned in a disappointing 4.90 ERA and 2.16 SO/BB rate in 2018 — he might yet help stabilize a team that trotted out the fifth-worst rotation in the majors last season. If, on the other hand, the veteran righty finds the hitter-friendly confines of Great American Ball Park a little too unforgiving this year, the Reds can take some comfort in the fact that he’s due to enter free agency in 2020.