Jake Peavy thinks he has figured it out

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Jake Peavy 2.jpgHere’s Jake Peavy not making sense when talking about people criticizing his early season performance:

”I didn’t hear all these critics talking last year, when I did what I
did after about the same amount of starts that I’ve made this year. [When I was] 3-0 with a low ERA, nobody was talking then.”

There’s a reason for that, Jake: you were 3-0 with a low ERA. Now you are not. I know that seems unfair and everything, but that’s kind of how criticism works.

But maybe it stops now, because Peavy thinks he has figured out the source of his troubles. And unlike the stuff about the criticism, this does make a whole lot of sense:

”If you go look at my delivery at the start of last year to what it was
before my last start, it doesn’t look like the same guy. A big part of that is my legs. For some reason, I quit using my legs.
It’s pretty easy to think why.”

The reason is that his big injury last year was an ankle injury, and Peavy thinks that he’s been unconsciously favoring his lower body since coming back, thereby screwing up his overall mechanics.

Like I said, that makes sense. If you read a lot about pitching and pitching mechanics, it’s amazing how little you hear about guys’ arms and how much you hear about legs. Sure, arm angles get token mentions, but it’s all about the base. The foundation, the kick, the push-off, the stride, the plant and the landing.

Peavy goes tonight against Rich Harden and the Rangers, so we’ll see if the diagnosis has been followed by a cure.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.