20-0: The Pirates get keel-hauled by the Brewers

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In this morning’s And That Happened recaps I said about the Pirates: “when they lose, they don’t mess around. They go out there and lose with
gusto.”  They just took things to a whole new level, getting beat by the Brewers (gulp) 20-0 this afternoon, setting the mark for the worst shutout ever. The Brewers outscored the Pirates 36-1 in their three-game series.

I only managed to catch the end of this debacle, but the two things of note I saw:

  • The Pirates played the infield in with runners on base in the ninth, trailing 16-0. Jon Heyman had the line of the day on that one, noting that “you never want
    that 17th run coming home!”

  • The Brewers brought in Trevor Hoffman to pitch the ninth with a 20-0 lead. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that he’s never had a bigger cushion (UPDATE: yep, this was his biggest cushion*). And no, don’t jump on the Brew Crew for bringing him in. He hadn’t pitched in a week, so this was just a workout for him.

I’d go through the box score and pass on the highs and lows, but this one was just too ugly for words.

*Thanks to Matthew Pouliot — whose Baseaball-Reference Play Index-fu is vastly superior to my own.

Reds, Raisel Iglesias agree to three-year contract

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The Reds announced on Wednesday that the club and pitcher Raisel Iglesias agreed to a three-year contract. Iglesias had been on a seven-year, $27 million contract signed in June 2014 and had two years with $10 million remaining. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, the new contract is worth $24.125 million, so it’s a hefty pay raise for Iglesias.

Iglesias, who turns 29 years old in January, has gotten better every season pitching out of the Reds’ bullpen. In 2018, he posted a 2.38 ERA with 30 saves and an 80/25 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. Over his four-year career, the right-hander has 64 saves with a 2.97 ERA and a 359/106 K/BB ratio in 321 2/3 innings.

Iglesias gets little fanfare pitching for the Reds, fifth-place finishers in each of his four years, but he is certainly among baseball’s better relievers. Signing him to a new three-year deal gives them some certainty at the back of the bullpen in the near future.

There was a bit of confusion regarding his previous contract, which allowed him to opt out and file for arbitration if eligible. Iglesias has three years and 154 days of service time, so his new contract essentially covers his arbitration-eligible years.