Cubs' announcer Bob Brenly rips Alfonso Soriano

Leave a comment

On Monday night Alfonso Soriano hit a long fly ball that, had he been running out of the box instead of watching his handiwork, would have probably been a triple. It did not go unnoticed by Cubs’ radio TV announcer Bob Brenly, who snarked “wouldn’t it be refreshing if we could get our left-fielder to run as
hard as Ted Lilly does?” referring to Lilly’s attempted steal during a rehab start in Peoria.

He went on, saying that Soriano’s lack of hustle “sets a bad precedent to the team,” and sends “a bad message to the younger
players.”  Which would be a damning criticism if the Cubs actually had any younger players.

Seriously, though, Brenly has a point. Sure, old managers saying that guys don’t hustle is not exactly a newsworthy occurrence, but Alfonso Soriano doesn’t need to be making himself a point of contention at the moment. It’s not often that a team will simply eat $90 million by cutting a guy, but it’s not totally fantastical to think that it could happen here.

The new owners aren’t psychologically or politically invested in that awful contract and if the team tanks — as it appears it very well might — cutting loose a seemingly lackadaisical symbol of the failed former regime may actually win them some fan support. The manager is probably going to retire after this season. It wouldn’t be shocking to see the GM canned this fall as well. Why not clean out the dead wood leftfielder too?

I guess what I’m saying is that if I were Alfonso Soriano I’d at least try to hustle a little bit, because while your mileage may vary, it seems like getting $90 million to play baseball would be preferable to getting $90 million to do nothing.

Cubs won’t make Kyle Schwarber available in trade talks

Kyle Schwarber
Getty Images
4 Comments

Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that the Cubs won’t deal Kyle Schwarber this winter, despite multiple inquires from teams around the league. Schwarber is approaching his first year of arbitration and will remain under team control for another three seasons before reaching free agency in 2022.

The decision comes on the heels of one of the strongest seasons of the 25-year-old outfielder’s short career. Over 137 games and 510 PA for the Cubs, he proved a passable defender in left field and batted .238/.356/.467 with 26 home runs, an .823 OPS, and 3.2 fWAR in 2018. He also led the National League in intentional walks, with 20, and bumped up his total walks from 59 in 2017 to 78.

Despite his marked improvements from previous years, Schwarber’s performance still left something to be desired — specifically against left-handed pitchers, who held the slugger to a paltry .224/.352/.303 with four extra-base hits across 91 PA. Still, it’s evident the Cubs feel Schwarber is capable of strengthening his splits in the years to come, and they might stand to get more value from him on the field than they would in a trade this offseason.

Of course, that’s not to say the Cubs intend to pass the Winter Meetings in total silence, especially as they’ll be seeking bullpen and catching depth in advance of their 2019 run at the division title. As club president Theo Epstein remarked last week, “We’re certainly open and active in trade talks with a lot of deals that usually don’t come to fruition. So, we may make some trades. We could make big ones that transform the roster. We may make smaller complementary ones. But there’s certain things we’d like to accomplish.”