Shockingly, some Marlins actually like the Scott Stapp song

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Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post went in search of someone who might actually like the horrendous song Creed singer Scott Stapp recorded for the Marlins and shockingly found a few players who dig it.
Seriously:

Wes Helms–the veteran clubhouse leader known affectionately among his teammates as “Uncle Wes”–said he’s a huge fan of the song. “Love it. Love it,” he said. “I like that kind of music, anyway. I’m a rock guy. It’s a song that definitely gets you pumped up to play. The beat of it, his voice. It’s a great opening song.”

On the list of things I’d admit to, liking Creed, Scott Stapp, or his Marlins song would fall somewhere after murder and rooting for the Yankees, but to each his own I suppose.
Clay Hensley, Burke Badenhop, and John Baker also admitted to liking the song, although Baker did say that “some of the lyrics sound corny.”
One player replied “you don’t really want me to answer that, do you?” when asked if he liked the song, but amusingly he’s the one guy Capozzi decided to keep anonymous. You know, so he wouldn’t get picked on for having some semblance of musical taste in a clubhouse full of guys who rock out to Creed.

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.